How to run the 200m

How to run the 200m

The 200m is a sprint that also has an endurance element. To be successful in this race, you must have great acceleration, you must be able to maintain your top speed, and you must minimize your rate of deceleration.

You will see that the the best 200m sprinters in history all incorporated some form of 400m training to help with their conditioning in the 200m.

Speed will get you ahead, but conditioning and speed endurance will keep you at the front of the pack.

How should you run the 200m?

Start your blocks so that you run in a straight line that allows you to hit the curve.

This is important since you need to drive and power straight before your body starts to turn on the bend. You should hit the first bend in 6-8 strides. Do your best to make sure those strides are in a straight line.

How should you run the curve in the 200m?

Focus on your pace and cadence around the bend. Run the bend as if you are running a series of straight lines.

This will usually be 4-8 strides where you will run around the bend.

Accelerate out of the bend and onto the straight.

As you approach the end of the bend, focus on accelerating out of the bend into the finishing part of the race.

Increase your cadence and focus on being explosive with each stride.

You must maintain your form and minimize the chances of your body fatiguing. Focus on your technique, cadence, and being explosive so that you accelerate off each stride.

What are some things that you should consider when preparing to run the 200m sprint?

You should do cadence and speed endurance training. This should see you run distances between 300-600m at 80-90% of your maximum speed. This will allow you to get used to the cadence and build your speed endurance, so that you will be able to run more relaxed and you will be stronger when finishing your race.

Below are a few races that you should watch.

Wayde Van Niekerk

Usain Bolt

Michael Johnson

What is a good 200m time?

LevelMenWomen
Good23 seconds and under24 seconds and under
Great22 seconds and under23 seconds and under
Elite20 seconds and under22.5 seconds and under

What is the 200m world record?

  • The men’s 200m world record is 19.19 seconds by Usain Bolt.
  • The women’s 200m world record is 21.34 seconds by Florence Griffith-Joyner.

How can you run the 200m in 21 seconds?

To run the 200m in 21 seconds, you need to have a lot of speed and explosiveness. You should be able to run the 100m in 10.5 seconds. If you can run under 11 seconds, you will have the chance to run under 22 seconds in the 200m.

Other 200m training videos

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Clyde Hart 200/400m speed development training
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Featured image credit: Photo by Jonathan Chng on Unsplash